Can Morkies Be Left Alone? All You Need to Know


A Morkie being left home alone

Morkies are the best of both what Maltese and Yorkshire terriers have to offer, and I believe they have inherited a lot of the traits their parents have, the good and the bad. So, you’ve adopted a Morkie, or you’re thinking of adopting one, and you’re doing what all pet parents do- firing up Google and reading about every bit of info that the world wide web has to offer on Morkies.

Are you wondering if you can leave your Morkie home alone while you go to work or make a quick grocery run? Just look at the little furball. Go on, take a look. See how small he is? Imagine how scary it can be for the little pup.

So, can Morkies be left alone? Well, the short answer to that would be yes, you can, technically… but also, not really and, not for long. 

Let’s break it down. 

The Morkie, Explained: Characteristics of the breed

Morkies are lapdogs and require a lot of attention, love, and social interaction. The world is a big place for your Morkie, and you are his touchstone. Your lap is his safe-zone, and as a proud owner of a Morkie, you have to realize that their breed is just not meant to weather the vast and never-ending expanse that is your living room.

So, let’s understand why your Morkie cannot be left alone for long periods of time, and then see how you can go about making your house a safe zone in the short time you do have to. 

Your Morkie is a designer dog, no point denying it. He’s fancy. While no two Morkies are similar, there are certain traits that their breed shares, inherited from the parents.

1. Friendly

Your Morkie is definitely a friendly and sociable dog, and as such, they thrive in the presence of people. They are affectionate towards friends and family. You’ve probably noticed how much they love to cuddle and to be pet. They crave attention like most people crave Ben and Jerry’s. So leaving them at home, unattended, while you go to work is not only not wise, but just mean.

2. Curious, but easily bored

Just like Yorkies and the Maltese, Morkies are curious and love to explore their surroundings, meet new people. They are also very naughty, and often, their curiosity can have them getting into all kinds of scrapes like trying to go up or down a flight of stairs, which is very dangerous for them. As a breed, they are pretty vocal, but when bored and don’t get the attention they want, they will get yappier. 

3. Separation Anxiety

Morkies form strong attachments with their owners and families. That’s good, right? It is, but it also means that when you’re not around, your Morkie is going to feel anxious from the separation, however short.

While this is a treatable syndrome, it also is a gut-wrenching and guilt-inducing process for you as an owner. Keep an eye out for these symptoms – barking, chewing, defecating or urinating excessively when you’re not around, excessive whining or whimpering that gives way to noisy barking.

As a breed that is specifically designed to be around people, Morkies can be intimidated, lonely, and afraid if they find themselves alone.  

So, what do you do?

The Downside

You cannot leave him to wander through the house like you would a bigger breed like Labs or German Shepherds. Your living room is too big, let alone your entire house. Even a baby (doggie)-proofed house might hold dangerous turns and steep steps for your Morkie. This means you’ll have to leave him in a small cornered-off space, which, to your curious and sociable Morkie, will seem like a veritable prison. Plus, they have a specific eating schedule. You can’t just dump some kibbles and fill a bowl of water like you would for larger breeds. 

But, there are ways for you to leave him alone, but just for a short time while you grab some take-out or shop for groceries.

1. Cutting Corners, Literally

  • Baby proof your house. If you have to leave him home on his own, you need to make sure it is as safe as possible for him. 
  • He will wander around a lot, so try and find a safe space for him to stay comfortable, cozy, and as protected as he would be with you. Put a gate and limit his access to a big enough space-for his size, mind you- for him to move about without feeling restricted.
  • Leave some toys out for him, preferably something which has your scent on it to comfort him. 
  • If there’s trouble to be found, he’s going to find it, so eliminate all opportunities for him to get hurt or into trouble, like open sockets at his height, wobbly tables for him to knock over, or sharp jutting steps that they can bump into. Do a thorough sweep.
  • It might be advisable to look into investing in one of those smart food dispensers once you’ve trained your Morkie to know when mealtime is and how to use it.

2. Arrange for a dog-sitter

The best solution would be to leave him with a trusted friend or a sitter who both you and your Morkie are familiar with and like. It will be second best to being with you, but it is better than leaving him all alone and unattended. Having a human around will let him have the social interaction he needs while also making sure he is looked after, fed, and given all the belly rubs he deserves.

3. Consider getting another pet

Now, hear me out. Morkies are friendly, and they have an excellent track record of getting along with other dogs. Their desire for social interaction makes them warm and accepting, and they establish lasting and robust pack bonds. Having another dog around, preferably a larger, gentle breed, will mean they have each other to look out for and entertain each other.

Also, think of how adorable your Christmas cards will be, with your big baby and small baby sitting together and posing for the camera. 

Subsequently, cats are not advised as they can be too intimidating for your Morkie. Morkies can’t establish or sense territories, and a cat will most definitely not appreciate having a tiny 8-pound furball getting in its space. 

Final Thoughts

So, can Morkies be left alone? They can, but the question you should be asking is, should you leave your Morkie alone? Being a Morkie parent is a commitment, albeit a fulfilling one. So, if you’re only now looking to adopt a Morkie, consider doing a little more research into the breed and then making your choice.

More info on Morkies

Sources:

1) https://mymorkie.com/can-morkies-be-left-alone/

2) https://yorkiepage.com/health-and-care/how-long-can-a-yorkie-stay-home-alone/

3) https://thehappypuppysite.com/morkie-temperament/

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