Do Morkies Get Cold?


A cold morkie playing in snow

What do you get when you cross a Maltese and a Yorkshire Terrier? You get the cute and fun little package known as the Morkie! These small dogs are so much fun to be around, and they make excellent cuddle buddies as well.

But do Morkies get cold? Yes, unfortunately, Morkies get cold very quickly. That’s why owners of this cute breed need to be very mindful of keeping their pet warm, especially during the colder months of the year.

Still, the things that make Morkies unique also make them ideal for people who stay in apartments and urban settings. This kind of dog will be a perfect companion, especially if you live alone and want a loving dog to keep you company.

In this article, we’re going to help you understand everything you need to know about your Morkie’s relationship with the cold. We’ll look at why they get cold quickly and what you can do to help them stay comfy throughout the year.

Let’s get into it!


Why Do Morkies Get So Cold Easily?


First of all, let’s understand why Morkies tend to get cold a lot easier than other dog breeds. Two things come to mind: the dog’s size and the type of coat that it has.

You see, smaller animals, in general, tend to have a more challenging time regulating their body temperature when the climate starts to get cold. Dogs are no exception, especially when it comes to smaller breeds like the Morkie.

Smaller breeds tend to carry less body fat, making it more difficult for them to retain their heat.

The coat of the Morkie doesn’t make it any easier.

If you take a closer look at the Morkie, you’ll notice that it has long hair, but not fur. That’s why Morkies fall into the category of ‘non-shedding’ dogs. While they do not shed, long hair presents another challenge: they lose body heat much faster.

Unfortunately, having long hair means that Morkies miss out on having the ‘built-in’ winter jacket of having thick fur.


Why Does My Morkie Hate Going Outdoors?


If your Morkie refuses to step out of the house, it could be that the weather outside is too cold for it. Sure, you may feel like it’s not, but remember that Morkies are quite intelligent in their ways.

So, if they show signs of being unhappy when you take them out of the house, it could be that they need some added warmth.


How Can I Keep My Morkie Warm Outdoors?


If you still need to take your Morkie out even though the weather is cold, it’s essential to keep them as warm as possible. The easiest way you can do this is to invest in a little coat for your doggy!

But wait, don’t just put the first doggy sweater you find onto your Morkie. You’ll need to make sure that you’re putting the correct type of winter clothing on your dog. Thankfully, you have a wide range of options that include:

  • Lined and waterproof raincoat
  • Heavy sweater
  • Fleece
  • Parka
  • Windbreaker
  • Snowsuit
  • Fur or faux fur coat 

No matter what outfit you choose for your dog, be sure that it fits snuggly to cover the entire length of their bodies from their neck to tail.

In terms of sizing, you’ll want to pick a coat that’s snug but not too tight, so your Morkie stays comfortable. But don’t make it too big either, because that’ll just let all the hot air out and the cold air in. 


What Dangers Do Morkies Face In The Winter?


Now, here’s a question that almost all Morkie parents will want to know: what happens if their Morkie gets too cold, especially during a season like Winter?

For starters, Morkies exposed to the cold face the risk of suffering from hypothermia. That’s when their body temperature drops far below healthy levels.

Besides that, other common dangers also include frostbite and cracked paws. You see, Morkies have small feet that are at risk of freezing if they walk on cold surfaces.

On top of that, if you’re walking your Morkie on a road that’s been coated with salt, your dog might lick it off their paw later on. That could cause stomach upset or even make them sick.

So, aside from keeping your Morkie warm with the right clothing, you may also want to invest in some paw protection wax for them as well. Combine excellent paw protection with the right kind of winter coat, and your Morkie will stay warm and happy no matter where you take them!


How Do I Know When My Morkie Is Too Cold?


Dogs can’t tell you that they’re feeling too cold. Instead, you can look out for common signs and symptoms that they’re starting to feel the chill.


Shaking And Shivering

Shaking and shivering are the first clear signs that your Morkie is getting too cold. Just like us human beings, Morkie’s bodies shake and shiver as a way to generate more heat. Unfortunately, because they lack the insulation of having fur, they can’t retain that heat efficiently.


Wanting To Go Home or Seeking Shelter


Besides that, you might start to notice a change in their behavior. For starters, they might refuse to keep walking, no matter where you take them. Instead, they’ll try to turn back and pull you towards home.

Another possibility is that you might notice your Morkie seeking shelter. Sometimes while you’re walking, they might try to hide underneath a car, inside a box, or some other small place where they can try to warm themselves up.


Hunched Back and Tucking Their Tail In


Another common sign that your Morkie is feeling too cold is that they’ll try to hunch their backs and tuck their tails in. That’s because they’re trying to sort of fold their body in on itself in an attempt to stay as warm as possible.


Final Thoughts


Morkies make for excellent companions, especially if you’re living alone. They’re fun dogs to be around, and they’ve always got the energy to keep playing and running. Sadly, like most small dogs, they tend to get cold very quickly. That’s because they have hair and not fur like other dogs.

So, be mindful of low temperatures and keep your dog warm. Your Morkie will love you even more for it!

More info on Morkies

Sources:

“Cool” test: How to tell if your dog is too cold – Ontario SPCA and Humane Society

Morkie Mixed Dog Breed Pictures, Characteristics, & Facts (dogtime.com)

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