Whippet Boxer Mix (Boxerwhip): An Ultimate Guide


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The right dog needs to blend in with your lifestyle seamlessly while adding to the value of having a pet at home. Whippets and Boxers are excellent choices, but if you are in a dilemma on the most appropriate one, how about getting the Whippet Boxer mix?

The Whippet Boxer Mix, also known as the Whipox or the Boxerwhip, is a brilliant dog that balances the energetic and strong nature of the Boxer with the charming and friendly temperament of the Whippet. 

The mix brings the best of both worlds, giving you the best experience of spending time with it. But, you ought to understand how the dog came to be, its personality, what it looks like, and the care and maintenance it needs to thrive. Read on. 

Brief Overview of The Whippet Boxer Mix

The Whippet is a medium-sized dog known for its mellow yet playful personality. Its size and friendly temperament make it a suitable dog for families with children and other pets. Despite being bred as a working dog, it seamlessly blends in as a pet and enjoys time with its owners. 

On the other hand, the Boxer is a strong, muscular, medium to large-sized dog known for its high energy levels. It is always down for quality playtime and enjoys time in the outdoors, therefore perfect for families leading an active lifestyle. 

The two dogs bring about a mix that takes the Whippet’s calm and mellow personality, with the Boxer’s energy bursts when need be. The mix is an outgoing dog that will take rests and play with full energy when required. 

The History of Whippet Boxer Mix

The history of the Whippet Boxer mix is unclear, as with other crossbreeds. However, the Whippet and the Boxer parents have a clear history of how they came to be and how their popularity grew. 

On this note, we can look at the parents’ histories to understand what the mix could be like and find insights into its behavior and temperaments.

Whippet History

Whippets have been around since the 1800s. They can be traced back to England, where they were known to be part of the sighthound family, descendants of the greyhounds. Dogs in this family are similar; however, whippets are smaller than other greyhounds. 

Whippets were bred as working dogs to chase after small animals such as rabbits. These hunter dogs were trained to run after and knock down animals out of their burrows, and thanks to their high speeds, they thrived in hunting, and their popularity as hunter dogs grew quickly. 

Their popularity grew in England more than in other parts, and with time, this dog made its way into the United States. This followed recognition by the American Kennel Club in 1888. After this, the Kennel Club in England recognized Whippets as a breed in 1890.

Some people keep whippets as hunting dogs, but most owners keep them as pets. Their moderately outgoing yet gentle personality makes them a perfect match for families. 

Boxer History

Boxers are descendants of the extinct Bullenbeisser breeds crossed with the Mastiff, Bulldog, and Great Dane. It is also believed to have been crossed with a terrier too. The Boxer is a mix of different ancient dogs and has existed since the early 1900s. 

The Boxer was bred in Germany as bull baiting dogs and later as butcher’s helpers to help control cattle in slaughterhouses. It is believed they got their name from the German term ‘boxl,’ which referred to their slaughterhouse designation. 

Some believe the name to have come from the unique way they use their forepaws to play, just like a human boxer. 

Boxers’ popularity grew in Germany more than in other parts of the world and did not make their way into the United States until after World War I. Over time and after 1940, the breed grew and rose to become one of the most popular breeds in America. 

Boxers were considered working dogs, having been police dogs, and have been used as seeing-eye dogs for a long time. Today, they are bred as companion dogs, with some people keeping them as guard dogs. 

Whippet Boxer Mix Appearance

Whippets and Boxers are different in appearance; therefore, the mix can take a new build with dominant features from each of the parents. Since the mix is a relatively new crossbreed, there is not much information on characteristics, but you can expect it to have a mix of what the parents feature. 

Size

Since Boxers are medium to large dogs, the mix will most likely be a little larger than purebred whippets. The mix can take the Boxer’s muscular and sturdy build with the Whippet’s pointy face and vice versa. 

The Whippet Boxer mix can weigh between 25 to 86 pounds and stand as tall as 51 to 60.5 cm. The size can range closer to the Whippet or the Boxer, depending on the most dominant gene in the mix. 

Generally, the Whippet Boxer can be a sturdier version of the Whippet or the skinnier version of the Boxer. It may or may not have the flattish muzzle that boxers have and will most likely be an athletic dog, even though it might not match the Whippet’s speed. 

Coat Type and Colors

The Boxer is short-haired and comes with a smooth coat that lies tight to the body, while Whippets have a short, smooth coat. You can expect the Whippet Boxer mix to have a short and smooth coat. 

When it comes to colors, Boxers come in white, Brindle, and Fawn, whereas the Whippet comes in White, Black, Fawn, Brindle, Blue, and Red. The mix, therefore, can come in one of the colors from either parent or a mix of two colors. 

Whippet Boxer Mix Temperament

The temperament of the Whippet Boxer mix will most likely be a balance of the parents’ personalities or steer more towards one parent. 

The Boxer is known for its energetic and fearless traits, even though it has a softer side to its personality. It is loyal and loving to its family and enjoys a good time playing with other pets and people too. Boxers are cheerful and confident, traits that stand out from the rest. 

On the other hand, the Whippet has a strong instinct to chase and portrays a curious sense. This is owing to their earlier days having been trained as working and hunting dogs. Even so, they are loving and loyal and will enjoy playing with their families. 

One personality trait that stands out between the two breeds is their cold nature when they meet new people. The good thing is that they quickly warm up as long as the environment is comfortable and safe. 

Whippet Boxer mixes will have these characteristics, with some coming out more robust than others depending on the dominant gene. But all the same, they are loving, enjoy time with their families, and easily blend into an active-lifestyle family. 

How to Care for The Whippet Boxer Mix

Your furry friend will stay happy and healthy only if you accord them the care they need. Whippet Boxer mixes are not as demanding regarding care and maintenance, but like other dogs, there is a bare minimum that you need to aim for. 

That is feeding, exercise, training, and grooming. 

Whippet Boxer Mix Feeding

Owing to its active lifestyle, the Whippet Boxer mix will need a lot of food at appropriate intervals. This can be challenging to figure out, mainly because both parents have different feeding needs, and so is the mix. 

The best approach would be to see the vet and have them run a comprehensive check. This will determine what your dog needs regarding nutrition and how you can ensure you keep your dog healthy while meeting its energy requirements. 

Your vet will advise on possible diets you can adopt for your dog and if there will be a need for supplements as your dog ages. The thing with finding appropriate food for your dog is that what might work for one might not be suitable for your mix. So engage your vet to find the right food. 

Whippet Boxer Mix Exercise

Remember that the Whippet and the Boxer are highly energetic dogs; therefore, this mix needs a lot of exercise to expend any built-up energy. The mix has to be outdoors as much as possible with a bare minimum of an hour playing, taking a walk, or running at the park. 

This is why this dog only suits people that can dedicate time for the dog’s exercise and those that lead an active lifestyle overall. Whippet Boxer mixes require a lot of work to keep busy and need physical and mental stimulation to stay healthy. 

Whippet Boxer Mix Training

Like other crossbreeds, Whippet Boxer mixes need training to relate well with people and other pets. It is best to start training as early as possible and nurture your dog’s character from a young age. 

Whippets can be strong-willed and independent, whereas Boxers are prone to mischief. This mix of these traits can make it extremely difficult to train a Whippet Boxer mix, especially if you do not start training early. 

The good thing is that if you incorporate positive reinforcement during training, the dog is more likely to take commands and cues. Praise your dog whenever it takes a step in the right direction and have treats on hand to encourage a positive attitude towards training. 

Whippet Boxer Mix Grooming

The Whippet and Boxer are short-coated dogs, and so is the mix. The mix will likely require little grooming to keep the coat smooth and neat, but you do not have to worry about collecting balls of fur on the surfaces. 

Remember, the dog might shed a little and is not considered a hypoallergenic dog. 

Both parents are clean dogs, so you can expect the mix to stay clean and neat. But a monthly bath is required to clean the coat and remove dirt lodged under the fur. 

Whippet Boxer Mix Health Issues

It’s challenging to predict specific health issues your Whippet Boxer mix is predisposed to; however, those common in either parent might affect the mix. Here are some of the conditions that your Whippet Boxer mix may be predisposed to:

  • Deafness
  • Mitral Valve disease
  • Allergies
  • Anesthesia Sensitivity
  • Canine Hemangiosarcoma
  • Hypothyroidism
  • Gastric Dilation-Volvulus
  • Hip Dysplasia
  • Corneal Dystrophy
  • Orthopedic Injuries

FAQ

Can Whippet Boxer Mixes be Left Alone?

Whippet Boxer mixes are pretty independent; however, they thrive in the company of their families and might develop separation anxiety if left alone for a long time. They are highly interactive and would do best if around people most of the time. 

Are Whippet Boxer Mixes Good Family Dogs?

Whippet Boxer mixes are excellent family dogs, thanks to their loyal and friendly traits. They are gentle yet energetic, which makes them ideal for families with other pets and those leading an active lifestyle and looking for a dog that matches that kind of lifestyle. 

How Long Do Whippet Boxer Mixes Live?

With the proper care and routine health checks, a Whippet Boxer mix can live between 10 to 15 years. 

How Much Do Whippet Boxer Mixes Cost?

A whippet Boxer mix can cost between $800 to $1200. The total cost of acquiring one will depend on the breeder fees, the location, the generation of the puppy, and additional checks and tests before purchase. 

Final Thoughts

The Whippet Boxer mix is a family favorite, combining the mellow and gentle personality of the Whippet with the sturdy and energetic build of the Boxer. The mix brings out the best of its parents’ characteristics, making it a viable choice for families and individuals attracted by the Whippet and the Boxer. 

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Maureen G.

Maureen has been a Content Writer in the pet niche for over 5 years. She has vast knowledge on dog-related topics including dog breeds, dog health, dog care, and nutrition. With keen interest on the evolving world of dogs, Maureen stays on top of developments, specifically designer dogs. She is a part-time volunteer in dog shelters and rescue centers, therefore conversant with the day-to-day lives of dogs.

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